Red Schooner by Caymus Transit No. 2  Front Label
Red Schooner by Caymus Transit No. 2  Front LabelRed Schooner by Caymus Transit No. 2  Front Bottle Shot

Red Schooner by Caymus Transit No. 2

  • WW90
750ML / 14.3% ABV
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4.6 6 Ratings
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4.6 6 Ratings
750ML / 14.3% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Red Schooner's new "Red Wine of the World," this red blend is sourced from famed regions of southern Australia, the Barossa Valley and McLaren Vale. Consisting of Grenache, Shiraz and Mataro with a small amount of Cabernet Sauvignon, Transit 2 is bold yet nuanced, featuring scents and flavors of dark fruit, black pepper, leather and vibrant raspberries. A hint of mint stems from the region's native trees. Just like our Red Schooner Malbec from Argentina is known by the "voyage" that produced it, this wine is called a sequential "transit."


Critical Acclaim

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Wilfred Wong of Wine.com
COMMENTARY: The Red Schooner by Caymus Transit 2 is a lovely expression of an Australian red blend. TASTING NOTES: This wine sails with aromas and flavors of black fruit, savory spices, and oaky notes. Pair it with grilled tri-tips. (Tasted: July 18, 2022, San Francisco, CA)
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Red Schooner by Caymus

Red Schooner by Caymus

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Red Schooner by Caymus, South America
Red Schooner by Caymus Winery Video

Red Schooner started with appreciating good Malbec. We considered making this wine from vineyards in Napa Valley, but decided we should source the grapes from the place that is most widely recognized for having ideal conditions for this varietal. We found ourselves asking: Could we create a wine at Caymus Vineyards – our family winery – using fruit from another part of the world? That question inspired the idea for Red Schooner, a "Red Wine of the World" that is about the thrill of voyage and discovery. 

This Malbec is made from grapes grown in the Andes Mountains of Argentina and shipped chilled to Napa Valley. We then produce the wine in our Caymus style – dense, dark, powerful and supple. Falling outside standard labeling rules, Red Schooner has no vintage date, but instead is known by the voyage from which it has traveled. Charlie Wagner, Red Schooner’s director of winemaking, notes that he loves this wine’s lush softness – as well as the spirit of experimentation that lies behind its creation.

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South Australia is the historic heart of Australian wine, a great wine capital of the world, and home to some of the most famous regions. It produces more than 80% of Australia’s premium wine from some of the oldest vines in the world. There is an abundance of varieties and wide spectrum of styles to explore. From the rogue to refined, discover Australian wines that are far from ordinary.

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With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended red wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged resulting in a wide variety of red wine styles. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a red wine blend variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

How to Serve Red Wine

A common piece of advice is to serve red wine at “room temperature,” but this suggestion is imprecise. After all, room temperature in January is likely to be quite different than in August, even considering the possible effect of central heating and air conditioning systems. The proper temperature to aim for is 55° F to 60° F for lighter-bodied reds and 60° F to 65° F for fuller-bodied wines.

How Long Does Red Wine Last?

Once opened and re-corked, a bottle stored in a cool, dark environment (like your fridge) will stay fresh and nicely drinkable for a day or two. There are products available that can extend that period by a couple of days. As for unopened bottles, optimal storage means keeping them on their sides in a moderately humid environment at about 57° F. Red wines stored in this manner will stay good – and possibly improve – for anywhere from one year to multiple decades. Assessing how long to hold on to a bottle is a complicated science. If you are planning long-term storage of your reds, seek the advice of a wine professional.

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