Vina Maitia Aupa Pipeno 2021  Front Label
Vina Maitia Aupa Pipeno 2021  Front LabelVina Maitia Aupa Pipeno 2021  Front Bottle Shot

Vina Maitia Aupa Pipeno 2021

  • WS89
750ML / 13.3% ABV
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3.6 7 Ratings
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3.6 7 Ratings
750ML / 13.3% ABV

Winemaker Notes

This wine is a blend of 80% Pais and 20% Carignan from the southern Maule region of Chile and is made in an old style called Pipeño. The wine is light in color with bright notes of crushed raspberry, wild strawberry, and rose petals that lead into underlying hints of dried herbs, mint leaves, fennel and thyme. This fruit driven, easy drinking wine with a bit of animale has fresh acid with low tannin and can be enjoyed with a slight chill.

Blend: 80% Pais, 20% Carignan

Critical Acclaim

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WS 89
Wine Spectator

A lively and spirited red, with a mineral undercurrent to the dried raspberry and red currant core. Delivers details of dried rose petal, savory thyme and fennel seed on the clean finish. Pais and Carignane. Drink now.

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Vina Maitia

Vina Maitia

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Vina Maitia, South America
Vina Maitia Winemaker David Marcel Winery Image

David Marcel arrived to Chile fresh off the boat from France as a twenty-two year old winemaker looking for opportunity. After graduating with a wine degree from Montpelier, David worked for large wineries producing significant quantities of wine while simultaneously falling in love with his Chileño bride. 

David eventually decided to make his home in Chile, and two decades later, began producing wines primarily composed of Pais and Carignan from some of Chile’s most prized heritage old vines. David is a force and one of the most generous humans we have ever encountered. He is not only a strong voice for Viña Maitia, but he is also a tireless advocate for the artisan winemakers of Chile and continues to lead a path for his contemporaries, typically putting himself after others. David’s wines are understated, extremely drinkable wines of great value.

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Maule is the Central Valley’s most southern and coolest zone, reaching a southern latitude of 35°S, yet it is still warmer and drier than Bío-Bío to its south. The Maule Valley enjoys success with a unique set of grapes.

It lays claim to the local variety, Pais (synonymous with Tinta Pais, which is actually Tempranillo), which has dominated much of the region’s area under vine until the recent past. Now many growers, not confined by the tradition and regulations of the Old World, also successfully grow Cabernet Sauvignon.

While Maule’s total area under vine remains relatively static, its old Carignan vineyards are undergoing a great revival. The VIGNO (Vignadores del Carignan Vintners) group, an association in charge of promoting this long-forgotten variety, is getting fantastic results from the old vines in its dry-farmed coastal zones.

The Maule includes the subregions of Talca, San Clemente, San Javier, Parral, Linares and Cauquenes.

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With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended red wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged resulting in a wide variety of red wine styles. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a red wine blend variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

How to Serve Red Wine

A common piece of advice is to serve red wine at “room temperature,” but this suggestion is imprecise. After all, room temperature in January is likely to be quite different than in August, even considering the possible effect of central heating and air conditioning systems. The proper temperature to aim for is 55° F to 60° F for lighter-bodied reds and 60° F to 65° F for fuller-bodied wines.

How Long Does Red Wine Last?

Once opened and re-corked, a bottle stored in a cool, dark environment (like your fridge) will stay fresh and nicely drinkable for a day or two. There are products available that can extend that period by a couple of days. As for unopened bottles, optimal storage means keeping them on their sides in a moderately humid environment at about 57° F. Red wines stored in this manner will stay good – and possibly improve – for anywhere from one year to multiple decades. Assessing how long to hold on to a bottle is a complicated science. If you are planning long-term storage of your reds, seek the advice of a wine professional.

XXIMAITIA_AUPA_2021_2021 Item# 786262

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